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The contemporary challenges of francophone communities in Canada

Simon Langlois, President of the Academy of Social Sciences of the Royal Society of Canada

As part of the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, the Academy of Social Sciences of the Royal Society of Canada is hosting a Big Thinking presentation by Joseph Yvon Thériault on the topic of contemporary challenges of francophone communities in Canada, specifically in Quebec and in minority settings. The Academy brings together the best social science experts in Canada, specifically in law...

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SSHRC Scholarships and Fellowships 101 at Congress

SSHRC Staff

We in SSHRC’s Research Training Portfolio know that applying for a SSHRC award can be challenging. You spend all that time developing a great research question, pulling together all of your supporting documents, and getting feedback on your proposal from colleagues and peers to create something great.

This is why we’ve prepared an information session on SSHRC funding as part of Career Corner at Congress.

Join us on Wednesday, June 3 at 10:30 a.m. in the Congress Hub—East Expo Event Space for SSHRC Scholarships and Fellowships 101. There, program officers will walk you...

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An architectural gem with a green lining

Monique Roy-Sole, Research Communications Officer, University of Ottawa

One of the major hubs of activity during Congress 2015 will be the Social Sciences Building, which houses the University of Ottawa’s largest faculty. Inaugurated in the fall of 2012, the modern, light-filled structure gathers the entire Faculty of Social Sciences — more than 10,000 students, 260 full-time professors and 100 staff — under one roof. For first time in the faculty’s 60-year history, its departments, schools and institute are no longer scattered all over campus.

The 15-storey tower in the heart of campus will be the site of the Big Thinking series at Congress and of several association conferences. The Beer Tent will be located...

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A unique Canadian invention: 84th Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences

Jean-Marc Mangin and Nour Aoude, Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Some things change…

It can be hard to imagine that Congress, a meeting of more than 8,000 scholars and researchers, started when a handful of Canadian learned societies began exploring the idea of hosting their annual meetings at the same place, at the same time. In fact, there is evidence of this happening as early as 1922. Early players like the Canadian Political Science Association (CPSA), the Canadian Historical Society (now the Canadian Historical Association) and the Royal Society took the lead on this through the 1930s and 40s, calling themselves the ‘Learneds’. This may sound very grand, but our best estimates suggest that the whole population of humanists and social...

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Federalism as a tool to rethink our relations

Jean Leclair, Trudeau Fellow and Professor of Constitutional Law at the Université de Montréal

In Canada as elsewhere, Indigenous peoples have long been marginalized by the law. Recently, however, judicial decisions recognizing the existence of “aboriginal rights” have given certain Indigenous groups leverage in negotiating territorial agreements.

Despite these recent successes in Canadian courts, much of Canadian law still reflects the policies of subjugation of individual and collective Indigenous existence that the country applied without batting an eyelid before the 1950s.

The most difficult stumbling block in establishing relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples – an obstacle that constitutionalizing aboriginal rights has not resolved – is the essentialization of...

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